Community

We are in the business of reimagination. 

We embrace an integrated, personalized approach to everything we do — convinced that when we reimagine the limitless potential of space, we can reimagine the limitless potential of people.

Our culture embodies that conviction, as we continually pursue new ways to enhance our own potential knowing that everyone has an impact on the work we do. To be successful, we move quickly with a nimble, entrepreneurial spirit that drives our success and the success of our clients. While we pride ourselves on delivering results for our clients and recognition from our peers, we are most inspired by our people. 

Involvement

Our people are not only committed to their work and each other, but to our community. 

For the fourth straight year, the Puget Sound Business Journal honored PPM in 2021 with its Corporate Citizenship award for our philanthropic and community service work. As a company, we have committed to donating 1% of total revenues to non-profit organizations serving the communities where we work across the nation. 

Since our founding, we’ve contributed nearly $835,000 to more than 100 non-profits in our communities.

But our service is about more than writing a check. We actively participate in fundraising events, such as the Fred Hutch Obliteride. We also roll up our sleeves and partner with agencies such as Mary’s Place, building bunk beds and preparing space for its newest family shelter in Seattle. We also have strategic partnerships with Harlem Children’s Zone in New York and Langston House in Seattle led by our BlackPAC committee and every Juneteenth we donate our profits on that day to organizations that help advance the Black community.  

Every member of our team is encouraged to donate a week of paid time per year to community service.

Because if we are to truly reimagine the potential of people, it needs to start in our own backyard with others who are committed to making a difference. 

Thanks to PPM’s donation last fall, we were able to invest in some critical internet and streaming infrastructure that not only allowed us to livestream events in COVID times, but will enable us to connect with audiences and students remotely from here on out. One thing we learned through this year is that the ability to stream isn’t just a temporary replacement for in-person events — it’s an accessibility issue. Making our programs available online enables us to reach a lot of folks in our community that couldn’t connect with us before — including folks with disabilities, elders, young people and community members who used to live nearby but have been pushed to the exurbs due to gentrification. Making our programs more accessible is really important to us and to the artists and audiences and community members we serve. We are really, really looking forward to welcoming everyone back to our building soon for shows and classes, but even once we’re back to in-person events, we plan to continue to offer almost everything online as well to maintain those important community connections and better serve more folks. PPM’s support has made it possible for us to become more accessible.

One great example of what we were able to do thanks to PPM’s investment is a collaboration we did with the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC last October. Our original plan was to just have a few individual artists pre-record a little performance from their living rooms. Instead, we were able to live stream a full performance event from our stage — and include a dozen more youth participants than we would have otherwise.

Tim Lennon, Executive Director, Langston